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." >> a second explosion at the damaged fukushima at -- power plant and 11 people are injuried. japan offers assurances that risks remain low. tens of thousands of people are still missing amidst the race of trying to find loved ones. >> hello and welcome. also in this program, japan's stocks tumble. they take emergency action by pouring in cash to the market. >> japan's nuclear crisis appears to be deepening. in the last few hours, there has been a second explosion at the fukushima nuclear plant. speaking in the last hour, japan's cabinet secretary said the risk of today's explosion caused an uncontrolable leak of radiation is low. but the u.s. said it had moved away from the area after one of its aircraft carriers detected low-level radiation 160 kilometers off shore. tens of thousands of people have been evacuated from the area. let's go to my correspondent who is in japan in the sendai area with all the very latest. >> hello to you. you join me on the outskirts of sendai city. this main wall behind me is where the wall of tsunami, sea water, washed up about a half a mile from the harbor
>> susie: investors face fear and confusion as japan's nuclear crisis continues. energy regulators around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of t
: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska or u.s. territories in the pas civic. >> susie: besides japan's nuclear crisis a big spike in the japanese yen is creating a currency crisis. finance ministers from a
with gregory jaczko, chairman of the nuclear regular rah story commission, on japan's nuclear crisis and his agency's response. then more on the nuclear situation in japan as we take you live for a briefing of the nuclear regulatory industry. and later the cato institute has a conference marking the first anniversary of the signing of the health care law and it impact on the industry, the federal budget and the economy. >> tonight on c-span2, actor harry sheerer talks about the media's coverage of his adopted hometown of new orleans. he recently released a new film about hurricane katrina and louisiana called "the big uneasy. "it examines the causes of the city's flood after the 2005 hurricane. 7:15 pacific. >> tonight on c-span3, a white house summit on bullying featuring remarks from first lady michelle obama and president obama who discusses his own experiences with bullying as a child. >> as adults we all remember what it was like to see kids picked on in the schoolyard, and i have to say with big ears and the name that i have, i wasn't immune. [laughter] i didn't emerge u
. about the strategy in japan. tackling the issue in your opening statement i want to ask about your personal feelings about the situation he went to japan last year and so the tsunami on the coast of japan washing away cars and houses and the people are devastated but we want to ask about your personal goals and feelings on that. secondly he also touched on the possibility of assistance from the united states the japanese government said that japan asked for help u.s. forces in japan are you ready to provide that assistance?. >> the answer to your second question is yes and i help told prime minister kan we will provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance that we can provide it with capacity. the ability for us to help in the cleanup process and obviously we have is not like this you have a huge disruptions both in the infrastructure boats and houses and cars there washing into main thoroughfares and that requires heavy equipment and any but the assistance we can provide will be providing. i am heartbroken by this tragedy and when you see what is h
be moving. but let me tell you, this is -- this tsunami will not just be in japan. it will be felt, maybe not to this degree, but to some degree across many neighboring highlands and countries. >> thank you so much. we will be coming back to you. but right now, we want to go to david piper, he is our correspondent in bangkok and used to live in japan. david, you know, we are looking at the pictures coming in. are you looking at the same pictures? >> reporter: that's right. yeah, i am now. >> you see the shear magnitude of the wall of water, carrying everything in its path. you can only imagine with all of those vehicles that you can see being carried by that water that there might have been people inside. it. >> yes. i mean, that's the real worry at the moment. i know from covering the tsunami which hit christmas day, back in 2000 -- 4 or 5. it's often when the water goes back out tdrags people, carc and everything. and many, many people were never found after the tsunamis. when you look at impact of this. i said i spoke to you before, japan is best prepare in the world. but this seems so
's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i have two question. on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement but i'd like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year. now, tsunami hit coast of japan and waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i just want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and secondly, you also touched on assistance from the united states to japan. and japanese government said that the japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you willing to provide those assistance? >> the answer to your second question is, yes. i told prime minister kan we'll provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance to provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to i think help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions both in the infrastructure. you have boats and houses and cars that are washed in to main thoroughfares and any assistance
worldline. >>> the nuclear and safety agency here in japan said on a news conference on saturday morning said they detected nuclear levels considerably higher than yesterday. >> translator: according to typical sea water analysis, iodine levels at the facility of the south discharge outlet of the fukushima daiichi power plant which was 126 times the controlled limit yesterday, later rose to 140 times, and today was at 1,250.8 times the control limit. this figure means that if you drink 500 milliliters of such water, you would get a dose of one millisievert which is an average dose limit for adults. >> the situation at the fukushima daiichi plant remains serious. tokyo electric power company has had to change its strategy to restore cooling systems at the plant due to high radiation levels at the site. reactors one through four all lost their cooling capabilities when external and backup power supplies failed after the quake and tsunami. tepco has been working to restore external power while trying to cool the reactors. the three workers were exposed to highly radioactive water in
, because obviously, we are concerned about what is happening in japan. >> thank you, i'm with a japanese newspaper. i have two questions on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement, but i would like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year, and you went there, and now the tsunami off of the coast of japan and the waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. secondly, you also touched on possible assistance from the united states to japan, and japanese government publicly said that japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you waiting to provide those assistance? >> the answer to the second question is yes. i told prime minister kan that we will provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is that the main assistance that we will provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions
>> hello, everyone. welcome to special coverage of the latest events in japan. >> here's what he's happening at this moment. fears grow of a meltdown at the fukushima nuclear power plant in japan after a second explosion at the damaged facility. fuel rods and another reactor in fukushima are the u.n. regular agency says no chain reaction is taking place there. japanese engineers are stepping up efforts to prevent a meltdown at the nuclear power plant damaged in last friday's earthquake. the fukushima plant has been hit by two explosions. the latest happened early on monday. rapidly falling water levels have exposed fuel rods in another reactor, increasing the risk of a core meltdown. >> it's the third day of japan's nuclear crisis, and the situation at the fukushima power plant remains critical. now there has been a second explosion there. aerial footage shows two damaged reactor structures. a surveillance camera captured the moment of the blast which blew apart the concrete building surrending the number three reactor. the japanese government says this was a hydrogen explosion.
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another explosion overnight rocks the crippled nuclear power plant, as concerns grow over a possible meltdown. along the shattered coastline, 1,000 bodies are found, as the death toll soars. the prime minister calling this japan's worst crisis since world war ii. millions today face another day with no power, no water, and no food. we have the very latest for you on the explosion, the survivors, and the worldwide humanitarian effort. "early" this monday morning, march 14th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and thanks for joining us on this monday morning. you can see, these are just some of the images which have been coming in, and frankly, they speak for themselves. they're just unimaginable. >> the devastation that we first saw here friday morning, and now, in the days after this disaster in japan, we continue to get more images, more video of exactly the impact that this is having on this nation and the people there. damage estimates in the tens of billions of dollars. but, of course you can't put a dollar figure on the
of a long war in libya as moammar gadhafi digs in. >>> the nikkei rebounds as japan's nuclear angst eases a little bit and tokyo electric is ordered to pay compensation tore radiation leaks. >>> and his satirical take on world leaders and sports figure s. >>> this just in to cnn, israel former president has been sentenced to seven years in prison for rape. he was convicted on two charges of rape and other charges. throughout the trial, he maintained his innocence and continued to accuse his victims of fabricating stories. in. >>> now to libya and the fourth day of coalition air strikes on the country. >> it appears to be moammar gadhafi's compound. >> through the night, pro-gadhafi sources filled the skies of tripoli with anti-coalition fire. no aircraft was shot down. the coalition fired 159 tomahawk cruise missiles, hitting libyan air defense sites from tripoli to benghazi. missile attacks and air strikes have commanded scud missile sites. activity in the sky may now have peaked. the coalition air forces have moved from an action phase to what they call a patrolling phase now. >>> that
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another 1,000 bodies washed up along japan's earthquake and tsunami-ravaged coast, as the nuclear crisis deepens, with a new explosion at an already damaged power plant. ann curry reports live from the region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, march 14, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> the images continue to haunt us all. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. japan's prime minister calling this the gravest crisis in his country since world war ii. >> the death toll is now estimated at 10,000. that's expected to climb. so far, about 2,800 people are confirmed dead including those 1,000 bodies discovered overnight. meanwhile, 11 workers have been injured during a second hydrogen explosion today at the fukushima nuclear plant and the u.s. military shifted some of the fleet further away from shore after military personnel were exposed to low level radiation. the state department is warning americans
inaudible] >> from the japanese media because, obviously, we're concerned about what's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i'm with a japanese newspaper. i have two questions with the tragedy in japan. i would like to ask you about your personal feelings. you went to japan last year and waves have washed away cars and houses and the japanese people are devastated. i want to ask for your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and, secondly, you touched on the possible assistance from the united states to japan. and the japanese government reports that japan asked for help from united states forces in japan. are you waiting to provide that assistance? >> the answer to the second question is, yes. i told the prime minister that we'd provide whatever assistance. i think the biggest help will be the cleanup. when you have a tsunami as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions, both in infrastructure, boats, houses, cars, that are washed into main thoroughfares and that requires heavy equipment and so any assistance that we can provide, we'll be providing. i'm heartbroken b
, what happened in japan, like everybody else. it's just so devastating. i can't imagine that there's going to be one agency in massachusetts who just says, you go here, you here -- i'm concerned not only in massachusetts but throughout the country if something like this happens, i'm not confident yet and i'm hopeful someone can give me the information that make sure that we all know what to do. you know? is it evacuation? is it command and control? is it military? i think it's a combination of everything. can you shed any light on my thoughts? >> in timely, i can start and then like to have an opportunity, senator brown -- >> just do that. i don't want to take the senator's time. >> i want to make one point. >> i think you're asking an important question. >> okay. >> i'd urge -- >> many of our disasters -- we always start with who's going to be the closest responders, no matter how big the disaster. it's always the local responders. we saw this, they can be destroyed, in the disaster itself. we saw this in katrina and in the tsunami. the next is the governor and their team includin
in japan. another explosion overnight rocks a crippled nuclear power plant as concerns grow over a possible meltdown. along the shattered coastline a thousand bodies are found as the death toll soars. japan's prime minister calling this their worst crisis since world war ii. millions face the day with no power, no water, no food. we have more on the survivors and the humanitarian effort "early" this monday morning, march 14, 2011. thanks for joining us on this monday morning. you can see, these are some of the images which have been coming in and frankly they speak for themselves. unimaginable. >> the devastation we saw friday morning and now in the days after this disaster in japan we continue to get more images, more video of exactly the impact that this is having on this nation and the people. damage estimates in the tens of billions of dollars, but you can't put a dollar figure on the loss of life and death toll estimates continue to increase hour by hour. >> they do. you know how well prepared japan was. the sheer magnitude of this catastrophe is staggering. the numbers barely begin to
factual question which may be of interest of people watching relating to japan. there's been concern, and i think a certain amount of confusion about what the potential danger is to the u.s. from the nuclear plant problems in japan, and particularly as the media's been following the last few days and a sense that the possibility of a meltdown at the plant, the explosion, and emission of a large amount of radioactivity and people are concerned about the west coast of the u.s., particularly hawaii, guam, and other islands may be subject to some danger, and i wonder if you have a current sense of what that possibility is? >> i'll refer back to the statement made by the chairman of nuclear regulatory commission in looking at all the scenarios, they do not see radiation reaching the u.s. that it would be of a danger or require protective angsts, but anticipation of this, fema support with the department of energy have a system called rad net. it's been there and 24 hours a day, seven days a week monitors various channels, air, water, other types of things across the country, and so if we
. meanwhile, japan's national strategy minister appeared not to rule out nationalizing tepco fully or partially when asked about the government's plans for the company. >>> and elsewhere in the region, nina, you can see the negative sentiment found echoes with energy stocks finishing lower in sidney, as well. >>> let's turn our attention toward the u.s. stock markets. they managed to snap their three-day winning streak. in just the final hour of trading. here's how the numbers settled then. the dow dropped .2%, and when it comes to the nasdaq specifically, ebay shares weighed heavily on that tech-heavy index following the company's move to acquire gsi commerce. when it comes to the broad s&p, that index lost about $25% by the close. this is where we stand in terms of the pre-market action on the futures. and most of those markets up to the tune of about .3% to .4%. of course, things could change rally before they open, as we've seen on the ftse and other european markets starting on a positive note and falling further, pauline. >>> let's update you now on the situation in northern
forced from benjawahd and regrouped. >>> japan working to keep reactors cool and try to prevent radioactive water from leaking to the ocean. tons of water to keep fuel from overheating have been contaminated with radiation. workers are using sandbags and concrete panels to hold back the water. >>> pakistan's cricket team have been practicing for a game for which their world cup, standing, and national pride are at stake. on wednesday, pakistan plays india. a big match helping to soothe often bitter relations. thousands of people are expected to skip work to watch the game. i'm zain verjee in london. "world business today" starts now. >>> good morning from cnn london. >> and good afternoon from cnn hong kong, i'm pauline chu. this is kporld business today. the top stories on this wednesday, march 30, tepco's troubles keep mounting up. now the company's president has been hospitalized, apparently suffering from stress. >> high fuel prices and natural disasters clip qantas' wings. how the australian airline is cutting back. >> and businesses in india and pakistan are bowled over by
implicates our energy security. the situation in japan leads us to ask questions about our energy sources. in an economy that relies so heavily on oil, rising prices at the pump affect everybody. workers, farmers, truck drivers, restaurant owners, students who are lucky enough to have a car. businesses, you see rising prices at the pump hurt their bottom line. families feel the pinch when they filled their tanks. and for americans who are struggling to get by, a hike in gas prices really makes their lives that much harder. it hurts. if you are somebody who works in a relatively low-wage job and you have a commute to work, it takes up a big chunk of your income. you may not be able to buy as many groceries. you may have to cut back on medicine in order to fill the gas tank. this is something that everybody is affected by. we have been down this road before. it was three years ago that gas prices topped four dollars a gallon. -- $4 a gallon on. i was in the middle of a presidential campaign. working folks remember because it hit a lot of people pretty hard. and because we're at the height o
to the earthquake and tsunami in japan. from the white house, this is about 50 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. before i begin, i want to say a few words about the terrible tsunami that struck japan today. first and foremost, our thoughts and prayers are with the people of japan. this is potentially a catastrophic disaster. images of the destruction and flooding coming out of japan are simply heartbreaking. japan is, of course, one of our strongest and closest allies. and this morning i spoke with prime minister kan. on behalf of the american people, i conveyed our deepest condolences and offered our japanese friends whatever assistance is needed. we currently have an aircraft carrier in japan, and another is on its way. we also have a ship en route to the islands to assist as needed. the defense department is working to account for all our military personnel in japan. u.s. embassy personnel in tokyo moved to an offsite location. and the state department is working to account for and assist any and all american citizens who are in the country. tsunami warnings have been issued across the pacif
at fukushima. i put that question earlier to a correspondent who joined us in north east japan. pitt -- " >> well, they are still trying to figure out what to do with contaminated water. the contamination levels exceed 3500 times the legal limit today. the president has been hospitalized in tokyo for fatigue and dizzy spells, and he was last seen in public the day after the tsunami, so it seems that there is some disorder within the country. also, we have been hearing about the car -- harsh conditions, some sleeping in stairwells and only getting two meals a day of crackers and, and now, they are be putting in a gymnasium about 10 kilometers away from that. it does not look like they will get this thing under control anytime soon. >> but was chris reporting from japan. and there is talk about the safety of exports being sent from japan. these products are sent around the world. it is uncertain how much radiation has leaked from the fukushima facility, and that has led many to ban food imports from the region, but they export much more than food. there are now many unanswered question
, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may include air strikes on tanks and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. rob
. that is a completely separate matter. >> another question from the back. the lady. >> i am a historian of japan. i had a political question. criticism of the democratic party of japan for its handling, but there seem to be long term implications of the government. comparison being made with the earlier party. do they think the ldp would have done a better job? it seems to me that would pay half -- it would have to think that the other two would be better. >> the jury is not out on that question. >> still out. >> still loud, i am sorry. [laughter] i think they have a tremendous opportunity to prove that they are capable of being a ruling party that is as good or better than the ldp. if they fail to meet that challenge, then the sentiment will grow that maybe the ldp is the only one we can rely on, whatever their faults. >> i asked partly because i have a friend who is a supporter of the jdp and i think she's come panic richer -- comparing their reaction with the earlier party. i think she feels that they are at least trying to do better than the ldp and terms of getting the affirmation out. would you a
. >> japan is to de commission four of the reactors. tokyo electric power made the announcement three weeks after failing to bring reactors one to four under control. harmful levels of radiation have been detected in the area. the bbc's mark worthington told me owe -- how worrying these radiation levels are. >> they are the most concerning we've had outside the reactors. much higher than anything seen in the vea water until now. suggesting the radioactive material is somehow leaking out. an indication that there's a dispersal 16 kilometers to the south they have been much lower, but elevated levels all adding to the growing concern that this might have some kind of impact on japan's crucial fishery. >> so this is far from being under control. >> yes. and tepco has used almost that phrase saying they cannot say reactors one to four are at this stage under control. they are stabilizing slowly, they say, but because it's such a difficult task and because it's gone on so long and because they believe there's been a part of meltdown and because if you've seen the true scale of destruction, they
.s. government officials near the nuclear plant. there also are urging u.s. citizens to defer traveling to japan. we will hear from patrick kennedy at a deputy assistant secretary for overseas citizens service, james petit. this is 35 minutes. >> happy st. patrick's day. let's get right to business. we are fortunate to have with us today, individuals that can help address your questions about recent developments in japan regarding american citizens. the voluntary departure order that went out last night, i know it kept some of you up late. we have someone back and also address the ongoing efforts to help american citizens in the affected areas. patrick kennedy and jim mpetit -- jim petit are here to answer your questions. we will go right to your questions. >> questions, anyone? >> when you implement it -- update offset some of the implementation of the measures you talked about last night? and the effort to evacuate americans that are in a 50-mile radius around the nuclear plant. there is a reasoning for authorized departure. is it because of the radiation concerns or the broader picture? >> w
and our attention. before i begin with my statement, i would like to recognize the people of japan and ask that we keep them in our thoughts and prayers as they we roof from the -- recover from the earthquake and tsunami. these unt fortunate events, however underscore our alliance and strong relationship with the japanese people. our military forces in japan are helping with search and recovery efforts. further, other civilian agencies like u.s.-aid and fema and the nuclear regulatory commission are assisting japan. in the wake of this unfortunate tragedy, we must continue to focus our military resources on this important region of the world. nearly 42% of all u.s. trade occurs with asian-pacific nations which makes this area critical to our national economic security. i applaud this administration for its greatly increased focus on the asia pacific region. to highlight this point, one the first major actions of the obama administration was the signing of the so-called guam international agreement by secretary of state hillary clinton hillary and then the foreign minister. however, despite
change sides calling for the president's oyster. and the situation of the japan's crippled nu crippled nuke chenuclear plantse availablize ie izstabilizing. >>> we begin in libya. u.s. says coalition air strikes have established a no fly zone in the east soon to be extendeded to tripoli. richard engel, they say the operation went as well as could be expected. but there are a lot of questions remaining about whether we'll be able to turn this command over to whom and the opposition. how much do we though about the opposition in wlib qua and how do you distinguish between rebel forces and civilians? >> reporter: it's difficult to distinguish from rebel forces and civilians because the rebels until a few days ago or a few weeks ago were mostly civilians and they don't have a cheer leadership, they don't have uniforms. they don't have marked vehicles. and a lot of them are very undisciplined and up frofrnfo l unprofessional. they were trying to see how extensive the air and missile strikes were yesterday. today we were just out with rebel, watching them get into pickup trucks and head tow
." >> more troubles for japan's stricken nuclear plant as two are taken to the hospital for nuclear expose your of radiation. and it could take weeks to destroy gaddafi's military. welcome to "bbc world news." i'm david eades. also coming up in the program. a call to martyrdom, a video showing pakistani children acting out a suicide bombing. >> hello. two workers at japan's power plant have been taken to the hospital after being exposed to high levels of radiation. the radiation has already gotten into the water supply although japanese authorities say it's now safe for babies. there's a news conference the japanese cabinet member describes what has happened to the workers. >> yesterday at reactor building number three, workers were laying cables. radiation levels is being monitored constantly by their individual sim tris, but the water contained higher levels of radiation. as a result, the workers were exposed to the radiation of more than 170 middle veertveerts. they have been transfered to hospitals to seek necessary treatment. >> well, aid is beginning to get through to some on the nor
strikes off the coast of japan sending tremors all the way to tokyo. >>> i just broke into a house and the owners came home. >> you broke into a house? >> we bring you a 911 call with the difference. >>> we begin this hour with libyan leader moammar gadhafi. as civil war rages, he has taken to the air waves to deliver another rambling speech. he told his supporters the rebels who have taken control of parts of the country are "traitors." he talked up the libyan standard of living saying it was the envy of many in the world and urging his country men to stand up and defend it. and he repeated his claim that al qaeda is to blame for unrest in libya saying it has drugged young people to get them to fight. >> they don't understand economic politics, sociology, technology, in order to be used for the welfare of humanity. they want to destroy our great industrial labor, our technology, bridges. those things for them is good. they have -- their good action is to destroy the -- our culture, our schools, our hospitals. they consider themselves and other people are all infidels. those are th
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
for the continued cooperation between our countries. we're obviously following what is happening in japan on a minute-by-minute basis. ireland has generously contributed to the appeal for humanitarian assistance. we are also grateful for the offer of irish experts to assist in dealing with this. both ireland and united states know that japan has been generous in the past three timess' -- during others' of need. the conversation that we had about libya began with the passage of the un security council resolution 1973, which provides authority to the international community to take enforcement actions to protect civilians in libya. the libyan people have called for international assistance. this resolution paves the way for that call to be answered. colonel gaddafi's refusal to hear the repeated calls, up until now, to halt violence against his own people, has left us with no other choice but to pursue this course of action. while this resolution is an important step, it is only that -- an important step. we and our partners will continue to explore the most important -- expected measures t
in japan, more fears as the damaged nuclear plant spike at 3,000 times the normal level. >>> rebels in libya face more setbacks in the push against moammar gadhafi's forces. u.s. president barack obama says he will not rule out arming the rebels. >>> a decisive moment in syria, the world is waiting to hear what the president will say one day after his cabinet quit. bashar assad will "face the nation" and has been lying low after two weeks of violent clashes between security forces and anti-government protests. thousands have been killed. and they poured into the capital tuesday. it is said the president could be about to lift the emergency law in place since 1963. he will bring you the address live as soon as it begins. >> right now, we're joined by hala gorani. you interviewed the spokesman from the embassy. good to see you. did he say anything about what we can expect bashar to say? >> we have spoken to embassy members and others and we are expecting bashar al-assad to lift the state of emergency that has been in place longer than he has been alive, 1962, the baathi baathi baathis
at noathat is furloughed for 21 days, if you live in japan or you live on the pacific coast or there are some tornadoes in the midwest, tough luck. we had to furlough those employees who would have warned you to evacuate the low-lying areas in the oregon-california coast and in hawaii but, no, they have targeted massive cuts at the noaa budget. $450 million. it's estimated that noaa would have, because of the time of year, 21 days of furloughs for all its employees. $110 million in cuts to the national weather service. a big cut to state disaster preparedness plans. so right now our emergency operation centers in oregon, in california, in hawaii are in full swing, and the reason that they are able to be in touch with people in scattered coastal communities, in relatively difficult areas is because of the federal assistance that we've given to them to set up these centers. and under the republicans' budget, we would cut $206 million from state emergency operation centers. now, where are the states going to get the money in this ba climate? i guess those places won't be tended to either. we won
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its decision. >>> the governments of japan and china are trying to repair their countries' tattered relations. high-ranking officials from both sides have agreed to work together to promote mutual trust and respect. things soured last september after a chinese trawler collided with japanese coast guard ships near the senkaku islands in the east china sea. japanese vice foreign minister ken-ichiro sas aechlt and chinese vice foreign minister zhang jijun met on monday in tokyo. it's the first time this kind of meeting has happened since june 2009. they agreed this year will be important because next year marks the 40th anniversary of the normalization of diplomatic ties between their two nations. they also said their two governments would try to encourage harmony between their citizens. sasae reportedly told the chinese side the senkaku islands are an integral part of japan and there is no territorial issue between the two countries. it's also believed he proposed to resume stalled negotiations on the joint development of a gas field in the east china sea. zhang later told reporters t
would not be able to handle a nuclear emergency similar to the events unfoiledding in japan. however, administrator craig fugate told a senate committee yesterday the government as a whole is better prepared to deal with emergencies than it was before hurricane katrina. also testifying, the former inspector general who assessed fema operations since the hurricane. this is about two hours. >> the hearing will come to order. i thank everyone for their patience. as you know we had two votes on the floor. so we delayed the start of the hearing. i welcome, everyone. we convene this hearing which had been long-planned, long-scheduled on fema's ability to respond to a major catastrophe against the compelling backdrop of the tragically catastrophic events unfolding in japan. an earthquake and tsunami in rapid succession that have already resulted in twice as many deaths as al qaeda's attack on america on 9/11. of course no one believes that the death, and finding of the dead is over yet. the earthquake and tsunami have also caused fires and explosions at nuclear power plants that could have
association. >> video this morning courtesy of al-jazeera. this is the nuclear reactor in japan. according to the associated press, an explosion there destroyed a building housing the reactor. and also there are fears that it could melt down after being hit by the earthquake and tsunami there in japan. again, those reports saying that large amounts of radiation were coming out in the evacuation around the plant expanded. but officials didn't know how dangerous at this time the leak was to people. again that courtesy there from al-jazeera this morning of the plant. now, in related use, there are also reports this morning as far as those who are affected, 1,300 dead, 2,000 people in emergency shelters. as you see there, people waiting on top of buildings to be rescued by various means this morning. this courtesy of n.h.k. and also there and 50,000 emergency crews. we registered in finding out from you in our first 45 minutes this morning if what we were seeing in japan, not only with the disaster, but also in the reaction from the japanese authorities there, could prove threatening for the u
they were threatened and abused by soldiers after they blundered into a army checkpoint. >>> and japan hopes to have one cooling system working tomorrow. >>> i'm very ron ka de la cruz, now back to "hardball." >>> back to "hardball." time for "the sideshow." first up donald trump's brand of foreign policy. screw them. here he is on fox yesterday. >> i think i probably have more experience than anybody, whether i sell them real estate for tremendous amounts of money, i've dealt with everybody. by the way, i could tell you something else. i dealt with gadhafi. >> what did you do? >> you*u)ied the lead. >> excuse me. i rented him a piece of land. he paid me more for one night than the land was worth for the whole year or for two years and then didn't let him use the land. >> was that over in new jersey. >> i don't want to use the word screwed, but i screwed him. that's what we should be doing. >> well it happened during a 2009 visit to the united nations. gadhafi pitched his tent on property owned by donald trump after a lot of noise about it trump had the tent removed. to hear him tell it he k
by the president where u.s. military participation here would end. >>> plus, a troubling turn in japan. workers are pulled from the crippled reactor complex after smoke is seen rising from two of the reactors overnight. how big a setback is this? >>> it's monday, march 21st, 2011. i'm willie geist. chuck and savannah are traveling with the president in south america. we will hear from them later this hour. >>> let's get right to the run down, we begin with operation odyssey dawn in libya. punishing air strikes drove pro-gadhafi forces further from home base last night though it is unclear where gadhafi is at this hour. rebels celebrated after u.s., british and french planes demolished libyan tanks and took out air defenses. overnight the opposition said it had regained almost 40 miles of territory. colonel gadhafi appears to have escaped harm in the attack on his administration building. he has though warned of a long war and said he'd open up the government's arsenal to arm his supporters. >>> on sunday defense secretary robert gates reiterated that the u.s. has no plans to send in ground forc
in japan ignored safety warnings in one reactor and botched inspections at all six reactors shortly before the earthquake and the tsunami. better question for us, are we competent the inspection system in this country is any better? >>> finally, donald temp's foreign policy. cheat moammar gadhafi out of his money. we'll get to that in the sideshow. >>> we start with a deepening crisis in libya. nbc news chief correspondent richard engel standing by in benghazi, libya. richard, the latest on the ground. yesterday you were pessimistic about the ability of the troops in the rebel forces, that some who have military training aren't using it.รง those who don't have military training don't have the ability to fight this war. any better sign of their ability to move on tripoli today? >> reporter: no, still they are untrained and they don't have the capability to really take territory. this is something that the rebels themselves realize. i was speaking with some of the leaders of this revolt tonight and they were quite despondent. they recognize that the rebels need to be more disciplined, they
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